Sharenting: Do you share too much about your children on social media?

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Sharenting (or over sharenting) is a term used to describe the overuse of social media by parents to share content based on their children. It is related to the concept of “too much information”.

It is a common sight on everyone’s Facebook feed these days, parents constantly posting photos of their children. Birthdays, first days of school, festive celebrations, are all subject to sharenting. Most of the time, there will be random photo of a parent and child sharing a moment together. Parents will also post personal thoughts about their parenting joys which could be from how proud they are of their child, and at times parenting woes like how they are unable to cope with the children’s demands.

But have we ever thought if sharenting is appropriate. Are our children aware of what we post online about them without their permission? Does it compromise their safety and privacy? How is it going to affect them in the long run?

As parents, we should take into consideration how our sharing will affect our child later in life. We often want to share memorable milestones in our kids childhood. Some of the photos are probably harmless while some others could turn into a source of embarrassment when they are much older.

We must always consider our children’s right to privacy.

All photos posted have basic information attached which reveals where the photo was taken. So even if you may not have disclosed your child’s full name and other personal information, simply by posting the photo anyone can see what your child looks like and has access to other personal information.

Keep certain milestones special and within the family.

Last but not least, as a general rule, before your post anything about your child, make sure you are not doing it to boost your own ego.

Well, I guess its time for me to start on some housekeeping…

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Parents on the phone – when is it too much?

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Have you seen this viral image posted on facebook of a poster being pasted outside a daycare center telling parents to get off the phone and pay attention to their kids?

I understand that as parents, we have alot of things to deal with everyday. Some of us are working and we need our phones to settle urgent work emails, we have to liase with our spouses on certain things that needs to be done, catching up on world news to keep ourselves updated or simply having to score the best WWE supercard for that day. I am guilty too for spending too mich time on my gadgets.

But I think, our children want to feel valued and appreciated. We want to build a stronger relationship with each one of them. We need to keep on communicating with them to comprehend what our children are thinking so we can provide a venue for them to rant about the day. And giving them all our attention sends a very important message like “You are important to me”, “I enjoy being with you”. After all, our undivided attention may be the most valuable asset we can offer to our children.

Just good parenting?

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My eldest boy who will be turning 11 this November has had a mobile device in his possession for a couple of years now as I wanted him to easily communicate with me, his dad or the authorities in case of an emergency and also to gain access to the internet for its educational value. But Bug and I also knew that by providing these tools opens the door to a bunch of potential problems.

He has recently added some of his friends to his contact list and they have been communicating through WhatsApp. There is no simple answer to the question on whether I should read his text messages. I feel that he should reasonably expect some privacy as he is mature and that my interference will send a negative message to him by in the form of trust. But at the same time, he is still a child, and I have to step up and not get confuse about my role as a parent and that is to keep him safe by keeping an eye on his daily activities while I still can and giving him the best advises possible.

So I found out yesterday that there are a couple of girls having “crushes” on him. And they were telling him how they feel about him. My gosh! I did not have this privilege of getting myself heard when I was a child. I can’t even use the house phone to talk to a boy! So unfair! This is all new to me. It was really funny. My son being him, straight with no emotions, just told these girls that he doesn’t wish to talk about the “crush” topic or else he won’ be texting them ever again.

So my advises for him this morning was to respect others even when he is communicating with them over chats. Never to hurt anyone regardless of their attitude towards him. Be nice and stay focus in class. Life has so much to offer us. And this is just the beginning.

He did asked me though if I read his messages. Well of course I denied it. Just told him it was purely motherly instinct 🙂

Eshan, the special one…

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This is a subject that we keep close to our hearts.

He was three when the doctor said ,” Just by looking at him, I think he is autistic.”

As a parent, even though I was prepared,  I was truly upset. Being a nurse, which the doctor doesn’t know by the way as I didn’t disclose, I couldn’t accept the way he was diagnosed. Well, maybe not exactly diagnosed but as a medical practitioner, I don’t think you should say things like that unless if you are really, really, sure about it. Tests should be done and analysis should be based on results.

So, we had to take him for hearing test and a couple of other assessments before they can diagnose him so that the hospital will be able to refer him to the other channels for therapy. The ENT doctor wanted to put him up for General Anesthesia for his hearing tests which I was not keen at all. Call me old fashion but I just cannot put my son through it. Besides the common side effects of General Anesthesia, there was a study done recently which concluded the use of general anesthetic drugs may increase the risk for learning disabilities and behavior problems such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). I managed to convince Bug to stand by me on this, I based it on all my motherly instinct, I might be right, I might be wrong, and so, we took him off everything.